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Large treasure of Roman silver found in Germany

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Petar Gramatikov
Petar Gramatikovhttps://www.europeantimes.news
Dr. Petar Gramatikov is the Editor in Chief and Director of The European Times. He is a member of the Union of Bulgarian Reporters. Dr. Gramatikov has more than 20 years of Academic experience in different institutions for higher education in Bulgaria. He also examined lectures, related to theoretical problems involved in the application of international law in religious law where a special focus has been given to the legal framework of New Religious Movements, freedom of religion and self-determination, and State-Church relations for plural-ethnic states. In addition to his professional and academic experience, Dr. Gramatikov has more than 10 years Media experience where he hold a positions as Editor of a tourism quarterly periodical “Club Orpheus” magazine – “ORPHEUS CLUB Wellness” PLC, Plovdiv; Consultant and author of religious lectures for the specialized rubric for deaf people at the Bulgarian National Television and has been Accredited as a journalist from “Help the Needy” Public Newspaper at the United Nations Office in Geneva, Switzerland.

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In Germany, the archaeologists of the city of Augsburg have discovered end of last year the largest hoard of Roman coins ever discovered in Bavaria. It consists of coins about 1900 years old.

According to The History Blog, a treasure of approximately 5,600 silver denarii from the 1st and 2nd centuries AD was discovered in the Oberhausen area, the oldest part of the city. Archaeologists have examined a plot of land allocated for residential development there.

The most ancient coins in the hoard date from the period of the reign of the emperor Nero, that is, the middle of the 1st century. The most recent are from the reign of Emperor Septimius Severus (193-211 AD). Experts note that the treasure was found near the site of one of the first Roman bases in the region. By the way, the coins were scattered over a large area, but the ancient “container” for their storage could not be found.

“We assume that the treasure was hidden outside the city of Augusta Vindelikum, near the Via Claudia camp, around the beginning of the 3rd century,” says Sebastian Gairkhos, head of the archeology department of the city of Augsburg. the time of the rise of water in the river Vertakh. So the coins were scattered in the river gravel over a certain area. “

According to the expert, at the beginning of the 3rd century, an ordinary Roman soldier earned from 375 to 500 denarii, that is, the found treasure is equivalent to about 11-15 annual salaries of such a warrior. In addition to coins, archaeologists have also discovered hundreds of various Roman artifacts – weapons, tools, jewelry, dishes, vessels and much more.

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