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Petite brunette – a Bronze Age woman

Petar Gramatikov
Petar Gramatikovhttps://www.europeantimes.news
Dr. Petar Gramatikov is the Editor in Chief and Director of The European Times. He is a member of the Union of Bulgarian Reporters. Dr. Gramatikov has more than 20 years of Academic experience in different institutions for higher education in Bulgaria. He also examined lectures, related to theoretical problems involved in the application of international law in religious law where a special focus has been given to the legal framework of New Religious Movements, freedom of religion and self-determination, and State-Church relations for plural-ethnic states. In addition to his professional and academic experience, Dr. Gramatikov has more than 10 years Media experience where he hold a positions as Editor of a tourism quarterly periodical “Club Orpheus” magazine – “ORPHEUS CLUB Wellness” PLC, Plovdiv; Consultant and author of religious lectures for the specialized rubric for deaf people at the Bulgarian National Television and has been Accredited as a journalist from “Help the Needy” Public Newspaper at the United Nations Office in Geneva, Switzerland.

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The representative of the Unetice culture had fair skin, brown hair, a prominent chin and a miniature figure adorned with bronze and gold jewelry and a beautiful amber necklace.

In the course of their new study, scientists were able to find out what a woman who lived near the Czech city of Pardubice looked like in the Bronze Age, writes Expats.cz.

New forms of DNA analysis, plus extraordinarily well-preserved personal items, have made it possible to compile a very accurate appearance.

The woman, who, according to experts, died at about the age of 35, came from the highest social strata. She had fair skin, brown hair, wide-set brown eyes, a prominent chin, and a petite figure adorned with bronze and gold jewelry and a beautiful amber necklace.

Her grave is the richest for a woman of the Unetice culture, a group of people who lived in Central Europe from about 2300 to 1600 BC.

The woman was buried with five bronze bracelets, three bronze pins, two gold earrings, and a three-row amber necklace with over 400 beads. Moreover, as scientists note, this necklace has no analogues among the finds of this period.

Accurate anthropological reconstruction was made possible by the almost complete preservation of the skull, as well as DNA extracted from the bones. The analysis not only confirmed the sex, but also provided information about the color of the skin, hair and eyes.

“It soon became apparent that the local burial was a real goldmine, not only in terms of the richness of the funerary decorations of the local dead, but especially in terms of the wealth of completely unique information about this period,” the researchers explained.

The graves of this era in Bohemia have a large amount of amber, which makes them unique compared to other monuments in neighboring regions. Amber proves that in the Bronze Age there were inter-regional contacts between the locals.

Photo: Restored image of a woman from Bohemia

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