15 C
Brussels
Monday, June 27, 2022

Is it safe to urinate in the Mediterranean Sea

Gaston de Persigny
Gaston de Persigny
Gaston de Persigny - Reporter at The European Times News

More from the author

DISCLAIMER: Information and opinions reproduced in the articles are the ones of those stating them and it is their own responsibility. Publication in The European Times does not automatically means endorsement of the view, but the right to express it.

The authorities of the Mediterranean resort in Spain have warned tourists that it is not safe to urinate in the Mediterranean Sea, because. for such unsanitary actions face a huge fine. The relevant law has already entered into force, Spanish media reported.

The popular resort town of Vigo in Galicia, in northwestern Spain, has banned tourists from urinating not only in the sea, but also on the beaches. The ban is aimed at reducing sanitary risks, especially since during the high season, the city authorities install public toilets on the beaches. For violation, a caught vacationer faces a fine of up to 750 euros.

It’s unclear how local officials will enforce the rules, but tourists could still be caught, officials warned. However, this is not the only rule in force in the region. There are many rules that foreign tourists should be aware of this summer when heading to Spanish beaches. For example:

1. The country plans to fine everyone who leaves garbage behind, as well as those who bring a gas bottle or a barbecue to the beach. Those who are caught violating the rules will be fined 3,000 euros.

2. The use of soap in the sea is currently prohibited and it is no longer permitted to reserve a spot on the beach with a towel.

3. Spain has announced that local authorities will impose fines of up to 42 thousand rubles on anyone who is inappropriately dressed on the street. This includes women dressed only in a bikini or swimsuit, and men without outerwear. First of all, the ban applies to two resort regions – Mallorca and Barcelona.

4. Foreign tourists visiting restaurants in one of Mallorca’s most popular resorts during parties have been warned that they will not be allowed in T-shirts, T-shirts and glow-in-the-dark baseball caps. There is a dress code.

5. Mallorca and Ibiza in the Balearic Islands have announced that Britons will be limited to six drinks a day during an all-inclusive holiday. Drinks are now limited to three at lunch and three at dinner. The Balearic government also banned the sale of alcohol in stores from 21:30 to 8:00.

At one of the most popular resorts in Mallorca (Spain’s Balearic Islands in the Mediterranean), restaurateurs have said they will no longer let tourists dressed as “drunks”. The owners of restaurants and nightclubs united, introduced a dress code for travelers, stating that in terms of impoliteness, drunkenness and rudeness, this summer season is again lost for the Spanish island.

Business representatives of the Playa de Palma resort area, where primarily British tourists like to relax, claim that the locals are already fed up with the so-called “drunken tourism”, although the season has just begun, Spanish media reported. Now, a group of restaurants at the resort have banded together to introduce a new dress code that all tourists will have to follow or the latter will be denied access.

We list what is forbidden to wear to a restaurant on the Spanish resort islands:

1. Swimwear

2. Any accessories bought from street vendors, such as gold chains or glow-in-the-dark hats.

3. T-shirts without straps

4. Swimming trunks

5. T-shirts

6. Any clothing with slogans promoting “drunken tourism”

So far, 11 restaurants have backed the ban, all affiliated with the Palma Beach brand, but more are likely to follow.

How do you know if a restaurant supports the new dress code? The establishments have posted QR codes at the entrance so that visitors can check the establishment’s requirements for tourists. “The situation on public roads is now worse than in 2017, 2018 and 2019. We already consider the season lost in terms of controlling impoliteness and rudeness. We need government support because no organizations or residents can stop this,” Palma Beach CEO Juanmi Ferrer told the newspapers.

The resort areas are full of street vendors and shops selling weird novelties like parasol hats or illuminated sunglasses. Restaurants that supported the new rules noted that these accessories do not fit into the environment of quality restaurants, which only allow “plain clothing.”

They warned that while there might be some flexibility during the day, there would be no tolerance for appearances at night. Juanmi Ferrer said the goal was not to “prohibit”, but to “re-educate” the tourist with “friendly ways of communicating” so that they understand that their own attitude should change on repeat visits to the restaurant.

Hotel owners told the Spanish newspaper Diario de Mallorca that police had failed to crack down on street parties or “large groups of tourists who only seek to get drunk on public roads or even on the beach.”

Palm Beach manager Pedro Marin said that this contingent usually book a small number of nights in hotels, stay for three or four nights and spend about 30 or 40 euros per day, “usually on alcohol and cans of beer they consume on the street.” According to him, they arrive at the hotels in the morning and are drunk to such an extent that they cannot even walk. Their companions do not try to resist this, but simply leave them lying on the sidewalk until the tourist wakes up and comes to his senses.

The resort authorities are outraged by this behavior in public places and say that the police should be able to impose fines on the spot, as is the case in other civilized countries that value reputation, as the problem manifests itself on the streets of the resort.

- Advertisement -
- EXCLUSIVE CONTENT -spot_img

Leave a Reply

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement - spot_img

Must read

Latest articles