9.1 C
Brussels
Friday, February 3, 2023

The UN will soon lift restrictions on Russian food

DISCLAIMER: Information and opinions reproduced in the articles are the ones of those stating them and it is their own responsibility. Publication in The European Times does not automatically means endorsement of the view, but the right to express it.

Petar Gramatikov
Petar Gramatikovhttps://www.europeantimes.news
Dr. Petar Gramatikov is the Editor in Chief and Director of The European Times. He is a member of the Union of Bulgarian Reporters. Dr. Gramatikov has more than 20 years of Academic experience in different institutions for higher education in Bulgaria. He also examined lectures, related to theoretical problems involved in the application of international law in religious law where a special focus has been given to the legal framework of New Religious Movements, freedom of religion and self-determination, and State-Church relations for plural-ethnic states. In addition to his professional and academic experience, Dr. Gramatikov has more than 10 years Media experience where he hold a positions as Editor of a tourism quarterly periodical “Club Orpheus” magazine – “ORPHEUS CLUB Wellness” PLC, Plovdiv; Consultant and author of religious lectures for the specialized rubric for deaf people at the Bulgarian National Television and has been Accredited as a journalist from “Help the Needy” Public Newspaper at the United Nations Office in Geneva, Switzerland.

The UN promises that in the near future it will achieve the lifting of restrictions on Russian food exports in accordance with the Black Sea Grain Initiative. This was stated by Dmitry Polyansky, first deputy permanent representative of the Russian Federation to the UN, quoted by “Interfax”.

“The UN promises us that the result is forthcoming. When making a decision, we will evaluate the effectiveness of the implementation of the Russian part of the deal and the effectiveness of the relevant UN efforts,” Poliansky said.

The diplomat noted that the UN has until November 18 to fulfill its obligations – this date has been defined as the “logical deadline” for the current deal.

Earlier, the Russian Defense Ministry said Ukraine had guaranteed it would not use the humanitarian shipping corridor in the Black Sea to attack the Russian navy, after which Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered the country to resume its participation in the Black Sea Grain Initiative.

We recall that on November 3, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, during his visit to the Jordanian capital, Amman, called on the United Nations, which is the mediator in the deal on the export of grain from Ukrainian ports, to help implement the parts of the deal designed to ease Russian exports of food and fertilizers.

Russian agricultural exports are not specifically covered by sanctions imposed by the United States, the European Union and others, but Moscow says it is severely hampered by restrictions on its financial, logistics and insurance sectors.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, during his visit to the Jordanian capital Amman, called on the United Nations, which is brokering the deal to export grain from Ukrainian ports, to help implement parts of the deal designed to ease Russian food exports and fertilizers, reports Reuters.

On Wednesday, Russia resumed participation in the initiative after a four-day hiatus, easing pressure on food prices and allaying fears of a renewed global food crisis.

The agreement is due to expire on November 19 and Moscow has made clear it wants more done to ensure it can export its own food and fertilizer output amid Western sanctions imposed over the war in Ukraine.

“We still do not see results regarding the second aspect: the removal of obstacles to the export of Russian fertilizers and grain,” Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said at a press conference with his Jordanian counterpart.

“We once again called on the Secretary General of the United Nations to ensure that he will fulfill the obligations he accepted on his own initiative,” Lavrov added. He said the situation should be resolved “in the very near future”.

“If we talk about the volumes of fertilizers and grain in question, these volumes on the Russian side are incomparably larger than on the Ukrainian side,” Lavrov said.

Russian agricultural exports are not specifically covered by sanctions imposed by the United States, the European Union and others, but Moscow says it is severely hampered by restrictions on its financial, logistics and insurance sectors.

The initiative – brokered by Turkey and the UN – was agreed in July for 120 days.

Asked Thursday if Russia’s decision to return to the deal meant it was ready to agree to an extension, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said: “No, it doesn’t mean that.”

“It is necessary to assess … how all aspects of the deal are performed, all the parameters of the agreements and then make a decision.”

Russia suspended its participation in the agreement because of the attack on the Sevastopol naval port, but returned to the deal on Wednesday and vowed that even if it pulled out again, it would not prevent supplies from Ukraine to Turkey.

- Advertisement -

More from the author

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -
- Advertisement - spot_img

Must read

Latest articles