Religious News From Around the Web September 13, 2021

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Religious Artisans Find Inspiration in Faith
From stained-glass to calligraphy, art has always contributed to religious traditions. Forbidden images, illuminated manuscripts and even maps testify to the creativity humans bring to the project of making the transcendent tangible. Artists make meaning manifest visually, tactically and aurally. These five artisans leave the world more beautiful than they found it.

The Religious Freedom Impacts of Texas’ Abortion Law

By LoneStarMike (Own work) [CC BY 3.0],
via Wikimedia Commons

The Supreme Court, in a 5-4 decision, let a Texas abortion law stand last week. This law would prohibit abortion after about six weeks of pregnancy, which is when a heartbeat can usually be detected. The Texas legislators who drafted this law fashioned a novel and legally contested system to enforce it.
Pandemic Again Disrupts High Holy Days


ELIAS PUNCH
is licensed under CC BY 2.0

As customary, there will be celebrations and somber reflections as American Jews observe the upcoming High Holy Days — their faith’s most important period. There also will be deep disappointment, as rabbis once again cancel or limit in-person worship due to the persisting COVID-19 pandemic and quick-spreading delta variant. . “I’m crushed emotionally that we’re not able to be in-person,” said Rabbi Judith Siegal, whose Temple Judea in Coral Gables, Florida, will hold only virtual services for the holy days.
Religious Exemptions to Vaccine Mandates?
In March, 56 percent of U.S. adults favored offering religious exemptions to mask mandates. By June, that figure had dropped four percentage points to 52 percent, according to Public Religion Research Institute. In general, Americans are skeptical of those who say vaccine mandates – like the one proposed this month by President Joe Biden for private employers with more than 100 workers – violate religious freedom.

How 911 Changed Religion and Faith
The attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon 20 years ago, changed many Americans’ faith communities and spiritual lives as well as how we see our world and one another. Muslims particularly stood out against the religious landscape as they hadn’t before, as did Sikhs and others whose appearance marks their religious observances. Christians, Jews and people of no faith demanded deeper answers and examined their own and others’ beliefs more deeply.